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  1. Intel is yet has to announce its 9th Gen Core processors for laptops officially, but because the company needs to sort out all the things with authorities and regulators well in advance of actual product launches, CPU model numbers and general specifications have been published well ahead of the formal release. As it turns out, recently the company disclosed the first details about its 9th Gen mobile Core i9, Core i7, and Core i5 H-series processors for higher-end laptops.

    Before proceeding to the actual products, let us make it clear what Intel actually revealed. Among other things, Intel (and other companies) has a number of export compliance metrics for its CPUs, including GFLOPS, Adjusted Peak Performance (APP), and Composite Theoretical Performance (CTP). These metrics are used by various governments to determine capabilities of CPUs and other processors. The APP and GFLOPS metrics are used by the US Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS). Meanwhile, other authorities and regulators use CTP calculations, which are stated in Millions of Theoretical Operations Per Second (MTOPS), to assess what companies import to their countries. The CTP numbers are the ones that Intel published for its yet-to-be released CPUs.

    The mobile CPUs newly listed are the eight-core Core i9-9980HK processor with unlocked multiplier, the eight-core Core i9-9880H, the eight-core Core i7-9850H, the eight-core Core i7-9750H, the quad-core Core i5-9400H, and the quad-core Core i5-9300H. All of them are aimed at high-performance laptops for gamers and professionals and, according to Intel, will be launched in the second quarter. Since the new processors belong to Intel’s 9th Gen Core family are designed to feature hardware mitigations against specific Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities. Meanwhile, a quick look at the basic specs that Intel published as well as their CTP numbers can shed some light on general specifications of the upcoming 9th Gen Core H-series mobile processors.

    Intel 9th Gen Core CPUs for Desktops and High-End Notebooks
    Tier Model Application Cores Base
    Freq
    Turbo
    Freq
    L3 IGP IGP
    Freq
    TDP
    i9 i9-9900K Desktop 8 / 16 3.6 GHz 5.0 GHz 16 MB UHD 630 1200 95 W
    i9-9900KF Desktop 8 / 16 3.6 GHz - - 95 W
    i9-9980HK Notebook 8 / 16 ? UHD 630 (?) ? ?
    i9-9880H Notebook 8 / 16 ? 4.8 GHz ? ?
    i7 i7-9700K Desktop 8 / 8 3.6 GHz 4.9 GHz 12 MB UHD 630 1200 95 W
    i7-9700KF Desktop 8 / 8 3.6 GHz 4.9 GHz - - 95 W
    i7-9850H Notebook 8 / 8 ? 4.6 GHz UHD 630 (?) ? ?
    i7-9750H Notebook 8 / 8 ? 4.5 GHz ? ?
    i5 i5-9600K Desktop 6 / 6 3.7 GHz 4.6 GHz 9 MB UHD 630 1150 95 W
    i5-9600KF Desktop 6 / 6 3.7 GHz 4.6 GHz - - 95 W
    i5-9400 Desktop 6 / 6 2.9 GHz 4.1 GHz UHD 630 1050 65 W
    i5-9400F Desktop 6 / 6 2.9 GHz 4.1 GHz - - 65 W
    i5-9400H Notebook 4 / 8 ? 4.3 GHz 8 MB UHD 630 (?) ? ?
    i5-9300H Notebook ? 4.1 GHz ? ?
    i3 i3-9350KF Desktop 4 / 4 4.0 GHz 4.6 GHz - - 91 W
    i3-9100 Desktop ? ? 4.2 GHz 6 MB UHD 630 (?) ? ?

    NOTE 1: Keep in mind that Intel has only published very basic specificationsof its upcoming 9th Gen Core CPUs for notebooks (i.e., Turbo frequency and cache size), which is why a number of details published here (e.g., core count, iGPU) are not confirmed officially at this point.

    Obviously, the Core i9-9980HK and the Core i9-9980H will sit on top of the range offering eight cores with Hyper-Threading, 16 MB of L3 cache as well as Turbo frequencies close to their desktop counterparts. Meanwhile, the difference between CTP of desktop Core i9 and notebook Core i9 CPUs clearly indicates that their base clocks will be considerably lower, possibly to maintain a 45 W TDP.

    Intel’s Core i7-9850H and the Core i7-9750H processors will sit below their Core i9-branded brethren. These chips will feature eight cores (without HT) capable of running at up to 4.6 GHz along with 12 MB of L3 cache. Just like in case of higher-end parts, these CPUs will be clocked considerably lower than their desktop colleagues.

    Surprisingly, as far as the cache size and CTP numbers are concerned, the 9th Gen Core i5 H-series processors will not feature six cores, but will pack four Hyper-Threaded cores with 8 MB of L3. While the Core i5-9300H chip will probably run faster than the Core i5-8300H, the Core i5-9400H will have exactly the same base frequency as the Core i5-8400H as they have the same CTP of 254,167 MTOPS.

    In addition to mobile CPUs, Intel also disclosed some preliminary details about its entry-level quad-core Core i3-9100 CPU in its document. The chip will run at frequencies of up to 4.2 GHz and will feature 6 MB of L3 cache. Since this is a lower-end part, expect it to be priced accordingly.

    As always, Intel does not comment on unreleased products, so take every unconfirmed spec mentioned here with a grain of salt. What we do know for sure at this point is that Intel has finalized specs of its 9th Gen Core H-series processors for laptops and, if everything goes as planned, is on track to launch them in Q2 2019.

    NOTE 2: The screenshot of Intel’s document above has been altered in order to better represent the topic of the news story. The original document looks as follows:

    Related Reading

    Source: Intel (via momomo_us Twitter)

  2. One of the interesting elements to Intel’s unlocked 28-core Xeon W-3175 processor launch was that the motherboard options to support this processor were minimal. At present only ASUS and GIGABYTE have shown designs for it, and the GIGABYTE model is still a few months from production. As a result, most reviewers ended up with the ASUS ROG Dominus Extreme for the chip. At the time of the launch, the MSRP for this motherboard was not yet determined – ASUS had told us that the units they had shipped were only to OEMs at this point, and they were still looking into retail availability. Ultimately in our review, we guessed that the motherboard would be around $1500. It would appear that Newegg is now listing the motherboard at $1800.

  3. Samsung today introduced its new mid-range Google Android-based tablet. Despite its formal positioning for consumers, the Galaxy Tab S5e features a rather large 10.5-inch sAMOLED display, a decent SoC, plenty of memory as well as storage, an advanced audio sub-system, a USB Type-C connector, and even compatibility with Samsung’s DeX platform for productivity applications. In general, the new tablet from Samsung brings together a decent performance, a good display, compatibility with productivity apps, compact dimensions, and a relatively low price - a rather interesting combination that we have not encountered before.

    The Samsung Galaxy Tab S5e is powered by an unidentified SoC that integrates two 64-bit high-performance cores, six 64-bit energy-efficient cores, and an unknown iGPU. It is possible that the application processor was developed by Samsung itself, but at this point this is a speculation. The SoC is accompanied by 4 or 6 GB of DRAM and 64 or 128 GB of NAND flash storage (expandable by 512 GB using a microSDXC card). The tablet is outfitted with a 10.5-inch Super AMOLED display with a 2560×1600 resolution and thin bezels, similar to the one found on a considerably more expensive Galaxy Tab S4, but presumably without a stylus support. Imaging capabilities of the device comprise of a 13 MP rear sensor as well as an 8 MP front sensor.

    When it comes to wireless connectivity features of the Galaxy Tab S5e, they include an 802.11ac Wi-Fi controller with MU-MIMO support, and Bluetooth 5.0. Samsung says that models with a 4G/LTE modem will be available later. Since the product is aimed at consumers, not road warriors, prioritizing the launch of Wi-Fi-only versions makes sense for the manufacturer. As for wired I/O, the Galaxy Tab S5e is outfitted with a USB 3.1 Type-C interface for audio, data, and charging, as well as a set of POGO connectors for keyboards or some other gear.

    Like all good tablets these days, the Galaxy Tab S5e has a rather vast set of sensors, including an accelerometer, a gyroscope, a proximity sensor, a fingerprint scanner, a geomagnetic sensor (a compass), an RGB light sensor, and so on. The sensors can detect how the tablet is held (or placed) and then Samsung’s software automatically adjusts its quad-speaker audio sub-system co-designed with AKG for the best possible experience.

    Designed primarily with consumers in mind, the Galaxy Tab S5e is very light and compact. It weights 400 grams and is just 5.5 mm thick, which is considerably lighter and thinner when compared to most 10-inch class tablets. Despite its rather humble z-height, the tablet packs a 7,040 mAh battery that provides up to 14.5 hours of battery life, according to the manufacturer.

    Samsung Galaxy Tab S5e
      Specifications
    SoC 2 × high-performance cores at 2.0 GHz
    6 × energy-efficient cores at 1.7 GHz
    Graphics unknown
    Display 10.5-inch
    sAMOLED
    2560×1600
    Storage 64 GB or 128 GB
    + microSD up to 512 GB
    Memory 4 GB or 6 GB LPDDR4 (?)
    Wireless Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac 2.4G+5GHz, VHT80 MU-MIMO, Wi-Fi Direct, Bluetooth v5.0
    GPS GPS, Glonass, Beidou, Galileo
    Connectivity USB 3.1 Type-C for data and charging
    POGO connectors for keyboard
    Camera Rear Camera: 13 MP Autofocus (?)
    Front Camera: 8 MP Fixed Focus (?)
    Video Recording: UHD 4K (3840×2160) @ 30fps
    Playback: UHD 4K (3840×2160) @ 60fps
    Audio 4 × Speakers co-developed with AKG with Dolby Atmos certification
    USB-C headset
    Sensors Accelerometer, Fingerprint Sensor, Gyro Sensor, Geomagnetic Sensor, Hall Sensor, RGB Light Sensor
    Battery 7040 mAh
    Up to 14.5 hours
    Dimensions 245 × 160 × 5.5 mm
    400 grams (Wi-Fi)
    Color  Silver, Black, Gold
    OS Android 9.0 Pie
    Price starts at $399.99
    Accessories Book cover Keyboard, POGO Charging Dock, Slim cover, Book cover (not included)

    One interesting feature of the consumer-oriented Galaxy Tab S5e is its support for Samsung’s DeX platform that enables desktop-like experience on Android-based tablets (e.g., open up multiple windows, re-size windows, drag and drop content, etc.). Obviously, to take full advantage of DeX, users will need the optional Book Cover Keyboard that is sold separately. In the meantime, Samsung does not indicate that users may attach the tablet to a full-sized display using a USB Type-C to HDMI adapter if more screen real estate is needed, so this capability will likely remain exclusive to more expensive Galaxy Tab devices. Besides, the Galaxy Tab S5e also does not support Samsung’s Knox mobile security platform to protect valuable and confidential information, which is pretty logical given its positioning.

    Samsung plans to start sales of its Galaxy Tab S5e in the second quarter of 2019 starting at $399.99. To increase the value of the product, Samsung will include a 4-months YouTube Premium subscription and a 3-months Spotify Premium subscription with the device (at least where available). 4G/LTE-enabled models will follow on later this year, their pricing is unknown.

    Related Reading:

    Source: Samsung

  4. If every letter has a special meaning for a feature in a product, and a product portfolio offers a mix and match of those features, then eventually a combination of letters will end up with a secondary meaning. Today we’re seeing the beginning of the Kentucky Fried version of Intel: in the latest changelog to AIDA64, a well-known utility for system identification and testing, the company behind the software has added in the hooks and details for the Core i9-9900KFC.

    This CPU is as-yet unannounced by Intel. Software houses like the one behind AIDA, as well as OEMs, have to design software (and hardware) in advance of future products, and so they need to know the specifications and details in advance as well. It just so happens that sometimes those parts get listed in updates and changelogs, which is the case here.

    No other details other than the name are given, although we can infer a few things. Intel’s K processor line means that the processor will be overclockable, and the i9-9900 means that it will be using the fastest speeds of the generation. F processors are new to Intel’s lineup, and mean that the processor doesn’t have integrated graphics, and users will need a discrete graphics card to use the chip.

    The letter causing confusion however, is the C. In the past, Intel used ‘C’ to designate the Broadwell CPUs that had improved integrated graphics. This would fly in the face of the ‘F’ part of the name. However, those C processors also contained a small amount of eDRAM to act as a buffer between the L3 cache and the CPU. In our testing of those processors, it only really gave extra performance to integrated graphics workloads, which is where those Broadwell processors were focused.

    But if the naming holds true here, then Intel might be set to offer eDRAM on its high-end eight core processors. Given that we saw benchmark performance increases only on a couple of benchmarks, it will be interesting to hear what Intel has to say about the added benefits are here. Having a non-integrated graphics part with extra hardware to improve graphics performance is like a double edged sword, except with no swords and two hilts.

    But at least it is deep fried and from Kentucky, right? This chip needs some dip.

    We've reached out to the people behind AIDA, and Intel, for extra clarity on this processor.

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  5. Western Digital has published a register-transfer level (RTL) design abstraction of its in-house designed SweRV RISC-V core. The SweRV core is one of several RISC-V projects the company as undertaken as part of their effort to spearhead the ISA, its ecosystem, and foster their own transition away from licensed, royalty-charging CPU cores. In accordance with the more open design goals of RISC-V, the publication of the high-level representation of SweTV means that third parties can use it in their own chip designs, which will popularize not only the particular core design, but also the RISC-V architecture in general.

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