Open Source Software

  1. Microsoft has launched a new open-source project to develop the Bosque programming language. The purpose of the Bosque language project is to build a functional programming language that avoids “accidental complexity” in the development process.

    Design goals for the Bosque language include improved developer productivity, better software quality, and enablement of a range of new compilers and tool experiences. The new language is positioned as an experiment in regularized design for a machine-assisted, rapid, and reliable software development lifecycle.

    A key goal is elimination of accidental complexity. Bosque code is supposed to be simple and easy to comprehend for both machines and humans. But Bosque remains very much in development at this point; proponents do not recommend using Bosque for any production work. Developers are encouraged to experiment with it.

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  2. Want a good reason for the smashing success of the Python programming language? Look no further than the massive collection of libraries available for Python, both native and third-party libraries. With so many Python libraries out there, though, it’s no surprise that some don’t get all the attention they deserve. Plus, programmers who work exclusively in one domain don’t always know about the goodies available to them for other kinds of work.

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    (Insider Story)
  3. Microsoft’s open source development tool is an important piece of the developer’s toolkit. Built using GitHub’s cross-platform Electron framework, Visual Studio Code is a full-featured development editor that supports a wide selection of languages and platforms, from the familiar C and C# to modern environments and languages like Go and Node.js, with parity between Windows, MacOS, and Linux releases.

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    (Insider Story)
  4. On January 1, 2020, the 2.x branch of the Python programming language will no longer be supported by its creators, the Python Software Foundation. This date will mark the culmination of a drama that has stretched on for years—the transition from an older, less capable, widely used version of Python to a newer, more powerful version that still trails its predecessor in adoption.

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    (Insider Story)
  5. There once was a time when a starving PhD student could improvise a new programming language and within a few years the entire world was using it. That time is gone. Today, as evidenced by the rising popularity of languages like Kotlin and Go, seemingly the only way a new programming language hits the big time is with the generous backing of a megacorp.

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    (Insider Story)
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