Cloud Computing

  1. “The right tool for the right job.” If such wisdom holds true anywhere, it certainly holds true with the choice of database a developer picks for a given application. Document databases, one of the family of data products collectively referred to as “NoSQL,” are for developers who want to focus on their application rather than the database technology.

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    (Insider Story)
  2. Come microservice, come cloud, the line-of-business application is always going to be with us. We need to know how our businesses are working: how much we’re selling, how much we’re buying, how our customers are feeling, and every one of a thousand little markers that show the pulse of business.

    And that leaves us with the ever-present question: How do we show that information? That’s where business intelligence tools come in, to let us ask questions and get answers, exploring the ever-growing pool of business data we’re storing in our myriad business systems.

    Microsoft’s tool for that business data exploration is Power BI, even if you didn’t realize that.

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  3. The latest Garter Magic Quadrant report for cloud infrastructure is out. Usually, the release of a Magic Quadrant means I have to correct its findings when talking to my clients. Enterprises take these as gospel, managing by Magic Quadrant—and as a result picking their technology, often the wrong technology, for the wrong reasons.

    This time, I have good news: This cloud Magic Quadrant is one you can trust.

    In that chart, every provider in the upper right (the execution-plus-vision leadership quadrant)—Amazon Web Services, Microsoft, and Google—is truly a provider that matters in the IaaS space.

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  4. Amazon Web Services clearly dominates the field. One of the first clouds, AWS is today’s leading choice for good reason. It offers so many options and services under its virtual roof that it’s nearly impossible to summarize the breadth. There are dozens of machine types to choose from, dozens of ways to store data, and hundreds if not thousands of software packages you can use to build out your environment. That’s the definition of the 800-pound gorilla in the cloud.

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    (Insider Story)
  5. There seem to be two groups of people out there when it comes to cloud security: There are those who believe that public clouds are systemically unsafe, and those who believe clouds are impenetrable.

    They’re both wrong. Both of these myths are dangerous, and so they need to die.

    Kill this myth: If my data is in a public cloud, it’s inherently unsafe

    The thinking goes like this: Because I can’t see it or touch it, others can steal it.

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