Cloud Computing

  1. Quick! Name a log analysis service. If the first word that popped out of your mouth was “Splunk,” you’re far from alone.

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    (Insider Story)
  2. Backup is just good policy. You need the ability to back up data and applications someplace, so they can be restored somehow, to keep the business running in case of some natural or manmade disaster that takes the primary business-critical systems down.

    We have whole industries that provide backup sites and backup technology. They can be passive, meaning that you can restore the site in a short period of time and get back to operations. Or they can be active (which costs more), meaning it can instantly take over for the disabled systems with current data and code releases—in some cases, without the users even knowing.

    In the cloud, disaster recovery inolves a new set of choices that don’t look much like the ones you have for on-premises systems. The approach that you take should represent the value that the applications and data sets have for the business. I suggest that you look at the practicality of it all, and also make sure that you’re not spending more than the disaster recovery configuration is worth.

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  3. Azure Functions is the serverless compute offering in the Microsoft Azure cloud. Essentially, you don’t even need a virtual machine (VM) to run an Azure Function. Azure Functions are just an implementation of platform as a service (PaaS), one that is based on an event-driven programming model. This article presents an introduction to Azure Functions, why they are useful, and how we can work with them.

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    (Insider Story)
  4. Chef has been a leading open source tool for automating the provisioning and configuration of servers for the better part of a decade. In recent years the company added InSpec and Habitat to the portfolio, open source projects that automate policy compliance testing and the deployment and configuration of applications, respectively. The company’s flagship commercial offering, Chef Automate, brings all of these pieces together.  

    To read this article in full, please click here

    (Insider Story)
  5. “We’ve built a 70,000-node Mesos cluster for our developers, but they won’t use it. Can you help?” This was the beginning of a conversation with the VP of infrastructure operations in a very large and famous company. While an impressive feat to accomplish, it was also by far the largest containerized infrastructure setup I had seen that had gone unused—nor, sadly, was it an isolated incident.

    I’ve talked about this encounter with a large number of customers, analysts, friends, colleagues, partners, venture capitalists, and competitors. We all expressed similar experiences, and all wanted to know why this is so. After all, if so many resources are being wasted in our industry, we are all risking a great deal by not understanding and solving the problem. Otherwise, the next wave of adopters might start to doubt containers can help their businesses, and we would all need to starting polishing our resumes.

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