Cloud Computing

  1. The internet of things (IoT) and cloud-based providers are bound at the hip. That said, most people don’t understand how, why, or what to expect. I’ve been asked some good questions that drove me to do some research and testing. Perhaps the answers are of interest to you as well.

    1. Do you store the data in the cloud or the IoT device?

    This depends on a lot of things, but I have two rules of thumb: 

  2. Both Oracle and IBM have missed out on a $10 billion U.S. Department of Defense cloud contract. Amazon Web Services and Microsoft remain in the running. While $10 billion is a big prize, the bigger concern is that Oracle and IBM are increasingly out of the running for the much larger grand prize of $117 billion in cloud spending (across IaaS and PaaS) expected by 2021, according to IDC.

    To read this article in full, please click here

    (Insider Story)
  3. Docker is a software platform for building applications based on containers— small and lightweight execution environments that make shared use of the operating system kernel but otherwise run in isolation from one another. While containers as a concept have been around for some time, Docker, an open source project launched in 2013, helped popularize the technology, and has helped drive the trend towards containerizationand microservices in software development that has come to be known as cloud-native development.

    To read this article in full, please click here

  4. Blink and you might miss some of the most interesting developments around Docker these days. Kubernetes may be getting more of the hot-new-tool thunder, but Docker continues to offer “just enough” container orchestration for most development projects and deployments.

    To read this article in full, please click here

    (Insider Story)
  5. People come to me all of the time looking to reengineer their IT career with a cloud computing makeover. While this is typically a good move, I find that as the world of cloud computing becomes more complex, those looking to get higher-paying cloud computing jobs are making some wrong calls. Here’s two of the most common.

    Mistake No. 1: Going too wide

    I’ve often explained the benefit of being a jack of all trades, and master of some to people wanting to become a cloud computing architect. These are people who understand cloud technology and can pick and choose the optimal solutions to create a foundational cloud architecture.

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