Cloud Computing

  1. You can’t beat good BBQ. As long as I’ve been eating, I’ve loved the taste of BBQ cooked correctly, and I’ve loved the science of getting BBQ right, no matter brisket, ribs, pulled pork, or chicken. (Vegans may want to sit this blog out.)

    What’s clear to me is that the process and ingredients that it takes to make your cloud computing project work are directly related to how you get a perfectly smoked piece of meat. Here’s a bit of advice about both.

    The long game wins the race

    In the world of BBQ, you hear the term “low and slow” a great deal. It’s really the process of smoking meat at a lower temperature, for a longer time. Typically, eight to ten hours for a brisket.

    To read this article in full, please click here

  2. Two of IBM’s Watson-branded collection of machine-intelligence services will be available to run as standalone applications in the public or private cloud of your choice. IBM is delivering these local Watson services atop IBM Cloud Private for Data, a combined analytics and data governance platform that can be deployed on Kubernetes. 

    Ruchir Puri, CTO and chief architect for IBM Watson, said this was driven by customer demand for machine learning solutions that could be run where customer data already resides, typically a multicloud or hybrid cloud environment (see related interview).

    To read this article in full, please click here

  3. Jim Comfort is the right guy to talk to about IBM Cloud, not just because he’s general manager of IBM GTS Cloud Services. By his own account, Comfort was responsible for the 2013 acquisition of SoftLayer, whose 13 cloud datacenters immediately got IBM in the public cloud game.

    To read this article in full, please click here

    (Insider Story)
  4. One of the big issues facing anyone building a data-driven devops practice is, quite simply, the scale of the data you’re collecting. Logs from millions of users quickly add up, and the same is true of the internet of things or any other large source of data. It’s a world where you’re generating terabytes of data from which you need to understand quickly what that data is telling you.

    To read this article in full, please click here

    (Insider Story)
  5. Amazon Web Services is the clear cloud winner, sitting on a run rate of $27 billion and continuing to grow at 45 percent (or better). Where AWS’s lead is a bit murkier, however, is in the area of hybrid cloud, that mix of private and public cloud resources that AWS reluctantly embraced, while others raced to promote. Those others, especially Microsoft and IBM (with significant help from Red Hat), have a real shot at owning a bigger share of cloud growth, precisely because of their roots as stodgy and dull enterprise vendors.

    To read this article in full, please click here

    (Insider Story)
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