Cloud Computing

  1. There’s a culture in the US called the maker culture, a hipster phenomenon. Related to the hacker culture, it represents a technology-based extension of the DIY culture that revels in the creation of new devices or systems.

    I’ve been a maker for years. For me to feel like I’m accomplishing anything, I need to build physical things such as racing drones, motorcycles, books, on-demand video courses, and, yes, cloud-based software systems. If I don’t make things, I feel a bit empty and unfulfilled. I know there are many people out there who share this condition.

    Being a maker involves taking some sort of risk. The risk of failure is the reason many nonmakers use to avoid building things or systems. Dare I say that nonmakers are typically holding leadership positions, typically supervising the makers? This has been the way it’s been for hundreds of years.

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  2. With every innovation comes new complications. Containers made it possible to package and run applications in a convenient, portable form factor, but managing containers at scale is challenging to say the least.

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    (Insider Story)
  3. When you build code, you need to deliver it in a way it installs and runs with as little friction as possible. That’s easy in the traditional application world, where you can target an installer at the end of a build, delivering your code to repositories, stores, and system and service management platforms. But things are harder in the cloud, especially when you’re building distributed systems that rely on cloud-hosted orchestration platforms, running on Kubernetes, or deploying in a service mesh.

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    (Insider Story)
  4. No matter if you’re looking at Microsoft’s Azure Stack, Amazon Web Services’s Outpost, or Google's Kubernetes Engine (GKE) on premises, that emerging pattern is the same: placing an on-premises version of a pubic cloud’s cloud services that runs on hardware in the data center that you can see and touch.

    In other words, the private cloud is becoming a public-cloud peripheral more than a traditional decoupled private cloud.

    These new “public cloud peripherals” (PCPs) will probably have a few characteristics in common, including:

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  5. Cloud computing isn’t a technology problem solved by moving workloads out of private data centers and into public clouds. As cloud guru Bernard Golden puts it, “What you need to really take advantage of cloud computing is a complete rethink of your approach to IT.” Yet even this declaration, bold though it may be, doesn’t go far enough.

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    (Insider Story)
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